Viewing entries in
gardening

We'll be at SAYREVILLE DAY this Saturday 9/15!

We'll be at SAYREVILLE DAY this Saturday 9/15!

Hello Mana Physical Therapy followers. We will be at Sayreville Day this Saturday at Kennedy Park from 12-4pm. There will be lots of food, entertainment, and rides for the kids!

 Posted From Sayreville Recreation on Facebook

Posted From Sayreville Recreation on Facebook

Come to see us at our table and grab some swag! We will have t-shirts, water bottles, and more that you can WIN with a spin on the prize wheel.

We hope to see you on Saturday!

6827471001_3223b3947e_b.jpg

Throwing Athletes & The Risk of Injury

Throwing Athletes & The Risk of Injury

A pilot study was recently published in Orthopedic Physical Therapy Practice which looked at balance deficits in throwing athletes (specifically baseball players) and whether or not it could determine injury risk.  The study was a small sample size of just baseball pitchers but it did highlight some interesting points. The results showed that approximately 30% of the participants increased their injury risk after throwing an average of 30 pitches.  Further, the study highlighted a significant decline in performance on the Y-balance test following pitching.  

With any athlete, the concern is always keeping the individual healthy.  For baseball pitcher specifically we worry about shoulder, elbow, hip, and back issues that can start to develop as a result of poor transfer of energy during a pitch.  As such, there parameters put in place to avoid injury such as age-related restrictions on pitch count.  This article highlights that injury prevention tactics should also involve a thorough evaluation of the athlete including dynamic balance.  

At Mana Physical Therapy we provide each of our athletes with the dedicated time necessary to assess fully for range of motion, strength, and balance issues. Each evaluation is tailored specifically to that athlete’s sport in order to enhance outcomes following therapy and ensure a quick return to sport or an injury-free season.  Call 732-390-8100 today to schedule. 

 Shoulder Rehabilitation Physical Therapy Degeneration 

Study Reference: 

Schroeder, Stacia and Gorman, Sharon L. “Decrease Balance and Injury Risk in Adolescent Baseball Pitchers”.  Orthopedic Physical Therapy Practice.Volume 30, number 3 (2018): 156-9. 

What is MANUAL THERAPY?

What is MANUAL THERAPY?

At Mana Physical Therapy, we pride ourselves on being advanced orthopedic practitioners with refined manual therapy skills, but what does that mean for you?  

What is Manual Therapy?

Manual therapy is the use of hands-on techniques to reduce pain and/or restore mobility.  These techniques include mobilizing and manipulating soft-tissues, such as muscles, and bone/joints in order to increase circulation, reduce adhesions, relax muscles or improve range of motion.  All of the above will ultimately help to reduce pain.  

Three Manual Therapy Techniques Commonly Used

Joint mobilizations: This technique involves a physical therapist using his/her hands to help loosen up a joint and improve its range of motion.  Joint movement is not something a patient can achieve on their own and is often effective in helping to alleviate pain related to muscle spasms.  Muscles tend to spasm because a joint has become restricted and until the normal joint motion is restored, the muscles around that area will usually continue to spasm.

Soft Tissue Mobilization/Myofascial Release:  Once joint motion improves, the soft tissues may continue to have tension.  This is when a physical therapist will implement soft tissue mobilization techniques.  These involve movement of the tissue to improve fluid dynamics, decrease myofascial adhesions (scar tissue) and decrease pain/tension in the area. Specifically techniques such as instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, kneading and dynamic cupping are effective in achieving the above outcomes.  

High velocity-low amplitude thrust techniques:  These techniques involve taking a restricted joint to the end of its available range and thrusting (about ⅛ of an inch) to the end of the joint’s range of motion.  The technique is an aggressive joint mobilization technique but only moves the joint within its normal anatomical limit. It is very effective for stiff joints, when indicates and does not increase pain or damage the joint.   

 manual therapy physical therapy rehab sciatica low back pain rehabilitation

Is It Painful? 

Manual therapy is not meant to hurt, but there may be some discomfort felt because your physical therapist will be working on a painful or restricted area.  However, manual therapy is designed to help improve the patient’s symptoms; this is why actively communicating with your physical therapist is crucial to success with manual interventions.  A full assessment of your condition is alway completed before starting any hands-on technique and the techniques are then individualized to fit your specific needs and tolerance.  

How Is This Different Than a Massage? 

Some aspects of manual therapy are very similar to massage, however, manual therapy addresses very specific restrictions in soft tissues and joints. It is a therapeutic treatment performed by a licensed physical therapist who has extensive knowledge of anatomy.  

Can I just Stretch and Exercise?

While both of these are important, exercise and stretching alone cannot target specific areas like manual therapy can.  Exercise is of course a valuable part of physical therapy and research shows that manual therapy combined with exercise is the more effective treatment than either performed in isolation.  

Bottom Line: 

Manual therapy involves hands-on techniques which are tailored to your condition. Manual therapy can address all areas of the body and is extremely effective when combined with therapeutic exercise.  At Mana Physical Therapy we take the time to assess your specific needs and developed an intervention program right for you. If you are experiencing any aches, pains or just have some general questions on how we can help you, give us a call! 

Resources:

Abbott, J.H. et al. Manual therapy, exercise therapy, or both, in addition to usual care, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized controlled trial. 1: clinical effectiveness.  Osteoarthritis and Cartilage.  2013; 21, 4: 525-34.  

Bang M, Deyle G. Comparison of Supervised Exercise with and without Manual Physical Therapy for Patients with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy 2000; 30: 126-137.

Niemisto L, Lahtinen-Suopanki T, Rissanen P, Lindgren K, Sarna S, Hurri H. A Randomized Trial of Combined Manipulation, Stabilizing Exercises, and Physician Consultation Compared to Physician Consultation Alone for Chronic Low Back Pain. Spine 2003; 28: 2185-91.

Fourth Of July Safety Tips from our Physical Therapist

Fourth Of July Safety Tips from our Physical Therapist

Fourth of July is upon us and with it the season for outdoor BBQs and activities. Here are a few tips to keep you healthy and safe during the holiday! 

DON’T LIFT ALONE!

With the high temps in the forecast tomorrow a cooler with some cold drinks is sure to be a staple for your bbq, but do not lift it alone! Make sure to bend at the knees to get down to a level where the cooler is more level with your body, then use your legs to stand up rather than bending at the waist and lifting with your back. This will help you to avoid low back pain. 

HYDRATE!

Speaking of drinks, it’s important to get plenty of fluids before, during and after activity!  Consuming soda and alcohol is not going to do the trick.  Make sure to have WATER, especially with the heat we are having! 

 Hydration Water Physical Therapy Rehab Muscles Joints

STRETCH BEFORE YOU PLAY!

Backyard sports are a great way to spend time outside with friends, but make sure to do a dynamic warm-up and stretch before.  Do a light jog, some high knees or butt kicks, and stretch out your legs, arms and back before and after activity. Stretching can help to mitigate injury and soreness.  

WATCH YOUR POSTURE WHILE YOU PREP! 

While preparing those burgers and tossing those salads, try to stand on a padded surface and keep your weight distributed equally between both legs.  Choose a work area that is level to your arms when they are bent to 90 degrees.  This will help you to maintain good posture and avoid hunching over the surface you’re working at. 

EHFHFLBWCYOON4NN6HX77Q6OP4.jpg

ENJOY YOURSELF!

These tips will help to keep you healthy during the holiday and make sure you can fully enjoy the day! However, if you have any persistent pain or discomfort following your backyard BBQ, give us a call at MANA PHYSICAL THERAPY today by calling 732-390-8100! 

            

Spring Has Sprung! 7 Tips to Avoid Aches and Pains While Gardening

Spring Has Sprung! 7 Tips to Avoid Aches and Pains While Gardening

7 Tips to Avoid Aches and Pains While Gardening

Common gardening activities, such as digging, planting, weeding, mulching, and raking can cause stress and strain on muscles and joints.

The following tips can help minimize aches and pains:

1. Get moving before you garden.

A 10 minute brisk walk and stretches for the spine and limbs are good ways to warm up.

2. Change positions frequently to avoid stiffness or cramping.

Be aware of how your body feels as you work in your garden. If a part of your body starts to ache, take a break, stretch that body part in the opposite direction it was in, or switch to a different gardening activity. For example, if you've been leaning forward for more than a few minutes, and your back starts to ache, slowly stand up, and gently lean backwards a few times.

3. Use a garden cart or wheelbarrow to move heavy planting materials or tools.

Lift with your knees and use good posture while moving a cart or wheelbarrow.

4. Give your knees a break.

Use knee pads or a gardening pad. If kneeling or leaning down to the ground causes significant pain in your back or knees, consider using elevated planters to do your gardening. If kneeling on both knees causes discomfort in your back, try kneeling on one and keep the other foot on the ground.

5. Maintain good posture.

Use good body mechanics when you pick something up or pull on something, such as a weed. Bend your knees, tighten your abdominals, and keep your back straight as you lift or pull things. Avoid twisting your spine or knees when moving things to the side; instead, move your feet or pivot on your toes to turn your full body as one unit.

6. Take breaks.

If you haven't done gardening or other yard work in a while, plan to work in short stints, building in time for breaks before you start feeling aches and pains.

7. Keep moving after you garden.

End your gardening session with some gentle backward bending of your low back, a short walk and light stretching, similar to stretches done before starting.

Gardening Aches & Pain Back Pain Lumbar Cervical Neck Scoliosis Arthritis Bone Spurs Tendinitis


Author: Andrea Avruskin PT, DPT
from: https://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/gardening